Tiglath-Pileser III

Tiglath-pileser III in his war chariot, late eighth century B.C.E.  Neo-Assyrian Alabaster panel from Nimrud, British Museum, London.

Tiglath-Pileser III, king of Assyria (744–727 BCE) built a royal palace at Nimrud in modern northern Iraq. He had his royal annals carved on the walls of his palace depicting his military achievements. When he created Assyria's first professional standing army he incorporated large numbers of conquered people into the army. Tiglath-Pileser III discouraged revolts against Assyrian rule with the use of forced deportations of thousands of people all over the empire as he did with the Israelites. This section of a panel is divided into two registers with inscriptions. In the top register captives are led away with their belongings over their shoulders. The bottom register is a procession with Tiglath-Pileser III in his war chariot.

Tiglath-pileser III in his war chariot, late eighth century B.C.E.  Neo-Assyrian Alabaster panel from Nimrud, British Museum, London.

A region in northern Mesopotamia whose kings ruled most of the ancient Near East in the 8th and 7th centuries B.C.E.

A broad, diverse group of nations ruled by the government of a single nation.

Short written texts, generally inscribed on stone or clay and frequently recording an event or dedicating an object.

Short written texts, generally inscribed on stone or clay and frequently recording an event or dedicating an object.

An Assyrian city located on the upper Tigris River, known as Kalhu in Assyiran and Calah in the Hebrew Bible. Nimrud was the capital of the Neo-Assyiran empire for much of the ninth and eighth centuries B.C.E., and its palaces have yielded stunning archaeological artifacts.

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