Contributors

Meet Bible Odyssey Website contributors and find out more about their research and publications.

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  • David A. deSilva

    David A. deSilva Professor,  Ashland Theological Seminary

    David A. deSilva is Trustees’ Distinguished Professor of New Testament and Greek at Ashland Theological Seminary. He is the author of more than 20 books on Second Temple Judaism and early Christian literature, including Seeing Things John’s Way: The Rhetoric of the Book of Revelation (Westminster John Knox Press, 2009). 

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  • Paul Dilley

    Paul Dilley Assistant Professor,  University of Iowa

    Paul Dilley is an assistant professor in the Departments of Religious Studies and Classics at the University of Iowa, specializing in the study of early Christianity and ancient Mediterranean religions.  He has published on apocryphal literature and apostolic traditions in Late Antiquity.

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  • Lorenzo DiTommaso

    Lorenzo DiTommaso Professor,  Concordia University

    Lorenzo DiTommaso is professor and chair of religion at Concordia University, Montréal. His next book, The Architecture of Apocalypticism, the first volume of a trilogy, is forthcoming from Oxford University Press.

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  • Dixon-Helen

    Helen Dixon Teacher,  East Carolina University

    Helen Dixon teaches ancient and public history at East Carolina University in the University of North Carolina system. She earned her doctorate in Near Eastern Studies from the University of Michigan in 2013. Her research explores the ancient Mediterranean world through the culture, history, and impact of the Phoenicians in the first millennium BCE. While Phoenicians are often remembered as inventors of the alphabet and neighbors to biblical Israel, Dixon’s research examines other ways their religious, political, social, and art historical innovations shaped the ancient landscape.

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