Contributors

Meet Bible Odyssey Website contributors and find out more about their research and publications.

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  • F. Scott Spencer

    F. Scott Spencer Professor,  Baptist Theological Seminary

    F. Scott Spencer is professor of New Testament and biblical interpretation at the Baptist Theological Seminary, Richmond, Virginia. He is the author of Salty Wives, Spirited Mothers, and Savvy Widows: Capable Women of Purpose and Persistence in Luke’s Gospel (Eerdmans, 2012); The Gospel of Luke and Acts of the Apostles (Abingdon, 2008); and Journey through Acts: A Literary-Cultural Reading (Baker Academic, 2004).

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  • Chad Spigel

    Chad Spigel Assistant Professor,  Trinity University

    Chad Spigel is an assistant professor of religion at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. His book, Ancient Synagogue Seating Capacities: Methodology, Analysis and Limits, was published by Mohr Siebeck in 2012.   

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  • Jeffrey Stackert

    Jeffrey Stackert Assistant Professor,  University of Chicago

    Jeffrey Stackert, assistant professor of Hebrew Bible in the Divinity School, University of Chicago, is the author of Rewriting the Torah: Literary Revision in Deuteronomy and the Holiness Legislation (Mohr Siebeck, 2007). He is currently writing a book on the different portrayals of Moses and Mosaic prophecy in the Torah.

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  • stegman-thomas

    Thomas D. Stegman, S.J dean and professor of New Testament ,  Boston College School of Theology and Ministry

    Thomas D. Stegman, S.J., is dean and professor of New Testament at Boston College School of Theology and Ministry. He received his PhD in New Testament studies from Emory University and is the author of four books and two coedited volumes, including The Paulist Biblical Commentary (Mahwah, NJ: Paulist, 2018), to which he contributed a 50,000 word commentary on Romans.

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