Contributors

Meet Bible Odyssey Website contributors and find out more about their research and publications.

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  • gilders-william

    William K. Gilders Associate Professor,  Emory University

    William K. Gilders is an associate professor in the Department of Religion at Emory University. His research and teaching focus on cultural history, especially its religious dimensions, ranging from the ancient Mediterranean world to twenty-first century North America. He is the author of Blood Ritual in the Hebrew Bible: Meaning and Power (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004) and several articles on ancient Israelite religious practice interpreted from the perspective of anthropology and ritual theory.

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  • Terry Giles

    Terry Giles Professor,  Gannon University

    Terry Giles teaches biblical studies as professor of theology at Gannon University in Erie, Pennsylvania. 

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  • Beth Glazier-McDonald

    Beth Glazier-McDonald Professor,  Centre College

    Beth Glazier-McDonald is professor of religion at Centre College. She was a contributing author to Eerdmans’ Dictionary of the Bible, Women in Scripture, and The Women’s Bible Commentary. She has also written widely on the prophet Malachi.

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  • John Goldingay

    John Goldingay Professor,  Fuller Theological Seminary

    John Goldingay is the David Allan Hubbard Professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California. Previously he taught at St John’s Theological College, Nottingham, United Kingdom. He is also priest-in-charge of St Barnabas Church, Pasadena. He wrote the commentary on Isaiah in the New International Biblical Commentary (Hendrickson, 2001) and also the commentary on Isaiah in the Old Testament for Everyone series (Westminster John Knox, forthcoming).

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